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Hemingfords Flood Alleviation Scheme St Ives Cambridgeshire

Dodds, Dan and Loe, Louise and McNicol, Dave and Clough, Sharon Hemingfords Flood Alleviation Scheme St Ives Cambridgeshire. [Client Report] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Between September 2005 and May 2007, Oxford Archaeology (OA) carried out an archaeological watching brief between Hemingford Abbots and St Ives, Cambridgeshire (NGR: TL 2784 7149 to TL 3095 6992). The work was commissioned by Jackson Civil Engineering Ltd in advance of the construction of a 4.4 km length of flood defences. The watching brief revealed evidence of the former North Eastern Railway timber trestle causeway crossing alongside Town Bridge, St Ives, an unrecorded nonconformist cemetery north of Hemingford Grey and an earlier churchyard boundary wall alongside St James Church at Hemingford Grey. The remainder of the route traversed alluvial flood plains and other no evidence of significant archaeology was observed. From September to November 2006, Oxford Archaeology (OA) carried out an archaeological watching brief and subsequent excavation on behalf of the Environment Agency at the Flood Alleviation Scheme in Hemingford Grey near St. Ives, Cambridgeshire (NGR TL 29645 71228). The work was commissioned by Jackson Civil Engineering Ltd. on behalf of the Environment Agency and was carried out during work on the flood defences of the south bank of the River Great Ouse. The initial watching brief revealed a burial ground dedicated to the Society of Friends (the Quakers), which dates from the late 1600s to early 1700s. OxfordArchaeology carried out an excavation of all burials and deposits that were to be affected by the construction works. The excavation area was approximately 16.56 sq. m in size and contained at least sixteen inhumations in earth-cut graves. Some disarticulated human bone was recovered. Limited finds assemblages were also recovered during the excavations. The skeletons were in good condition, although many were incomplete, having been truncated by the insertion of later graves and modern intrusions. Evidence for disease was frequent among the burials and includes instances of amputation of the lower legs and scoliosis, a spinal deformity. Evidence of burial practice was recovered including items such as coffin nails and coffin fixtures and fittings.

Item Type:Client Report
Subjects:Geographical Areas > English Counties > Cambridgeshire
Period > UK Periods > Post Medieval 1540 - 1901 AD
ID Code:2505
Deposited By: Scott
Deposited On:29 May 2015 09:50
Last Modified:29 May 2015 09:50

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